HBCUs

Alphabetical Listing – click school to view website

The Hundred Seven HBCU List

There are 107 colleges in the United States that are identified by the US Department of Education as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).  Of those 107, three are currently closed. See the list below, ‘click’ the name and you will be transferred to its website.

Alabama A&M University
Alabama State University
Albany State University
Alcorn State University
Allen University
American Baptist College
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
Arkansas Baptist College
Barber-Scotia College**
Benedict College
Bennett College
Bethune-Cookman University
Birmingham-Easonian Baptist Bible College*
Bishop State Community College
Bluefield State College
Bowie State University
Carver College *
Central State University
Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science *
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania
Claflin University
Clark Atlanta University
Clinton College
Coahoma Community College
Concordia College, Alabama (closed 2018)
Coppin State University
Delaware State University
Denmark Technical College
Dillard University
University of the District of Columbia
Edward Waters College
Elizabeth City State University
Fayetteville State University
Fisk University
Florida A&M University
Florida Memorial University
Fort Valley State University
Gadsden State Community College (Valley Street campus)
Grambling State University
Hampton University
Harris-Stowe State University
Hinds Community College at Utica
Hood Theological *
Howard University
Huston-Tillotson University
Interdenominational Theological Center
J. F. Drake State Technical College
Jackson State University
Jarvis Christian College
Johnson C. Smith University
Johnson C Smith Theological Seminary *
Kentucky State University
Knoxville College **
Lane College
Langston University
Lawson State Community College
LeMoyne-Owen College
Lewis College of Business (closed 2013)
The Lincoln University
Lincoln University
Livingstone College
University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Meharry Medical College
Miles College
Miles School of Law *
Mississippi Valley State University
Morehouse College
Morehouse School of Medicine
Morgan State University
Morris Brown College **
Morris College
Norfolk State University
North Carolina A&T State University
North Carolina Central University
Oakwood University
Paine College
Paul Quinn College
Payne Theological *
Philander Smith College
Prairie View A&M University
Rust College
Saint Paul’s College (closed 2013)
Savannah State University
Selma University
Shaw University
Shelton State Community College– C A Fredd Campus
Shorter College 
Simmons College of Kentucky 
South Carolina State University
Southern University at New Orleans
Southern University at Shreveport
Southern University and A&M College
Southwestern Christian College
Spelman College
St. Augustine’s University
St. Philip’s College
Stillman College
Talladega College
Tennessee State University
Texas College
Texas Southern University
Tougaloo College
H. Councill Trenholm State Community College
Tuskegee University
University of the Virgin Islands
Virginia State University
Virginia Union University
Virginia University of Lynchburg
Voorhees College
West Virginia State University
Wilberforce University
Wiley College
Winston-Salem State University
Xavier University of Louisiana

Fraternities and Sororities 

Fraternities

Alpha Phi Alpha

Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African American Men, was founded on December 4, 1906™ at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York by seven college men who recognized the need for a strong bond of brotherhood among African descendants in this country.  The fraternity initially served as a study and support group for minority students who faced racial prejudice, both educationally and socially, at Cornell. The Jewel founders and early leaders of the fraternity succeeded in laying a firm foundation for Alpha Phi Alpha’s principles of scholarship, fellowship, good character, and the uplifting of humanity.

Alpha Phi Alpha chapters were established at other colleges and universities, many of them historically black institutions, soon after the founding at Cornell. The first alumni chapter was established in 1911. While continuing to stress academic excellence among its members, Alpha also recognized the need to help correct the educational, economic, political, and social injustices faced by African Americans. Alpha Phi Alpha has long stood at the forefront of the African-American community’s fight for civil rights through leaders such as W.E.B. DuBois, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Edward Brooke, Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Andrew Young, William Gray, Paul Robeson, and many others. True to its form as the “first of firsts,” Alpha Phi Alpha has been interracial since 1945.

Since its founding on December 4, 1906™, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. has supplied voice and vision to the struggle of African Americans and people of color around the world. https://apa1906.net/ 

Kappa Alpha Psi

Kappa Alpha Psi ®, a college Fraternity, was born in an environment saturated in racism. The state of Indiana became the 19th state of the Union in 1816 and it founded Indiana University in Bloomington four years later. This city was largely populated by settlers from below the Mason-Dixon line and therefore found many sympathizers of the Southern cause. Consequently, the few Blacks who took up residence in Bloomington in those early years were socially ostracized and encountered extreme acts of prejudice and discrimination. The state of Indiana became a stronghold for the Ku Klux Klan.  Their intolerance toward Blacks fueled the negative mindset of other Whites residing there.  Vigilante lynching’s of Blacks were commonplace.  This environment made day-to-day life for Blacks an arduous task and attempts to successfully achieve in school, nearly impossible.  Despite the growing hostility of Whites toward Blacks in Indiana, some Black students sought a college education at Indiana University, as it was a tuition-free university of the highest quality.  However, few Blacks could remain longer than a year or so without having to withdraw in search of employment.

The campus of Indiana University at that time did not encourage the assimilation of Blacks.  The administration maintained an attitude of indifference, as Blacks slowly matriculated and were likewise swiftly forgotten.  The percentage of Blacks on campus was less than 1%.  Blacks could go weeks without seeing one another on campus.  Blacks were not allowed to reside in on-campus dormitories, were not afforded off-campus accommodations, and they were also denied the use of all other university facilities, and were barred from participating in contact sports.  Track and Field was the only sport which Blacks were able to demonstrate their athleticism.

In the school years of 1910-11, a small group of Black students attended Indiana University.

Most of them were working their way through school.  The number of places where they might assemble was limited. Realizing that they had no part in the social life of the university and drawn together by common interests, they decided that a Greek-letter fraternity would do much to fill the missing link in their college existence.

Two of these men, Elder Watson Diggs and Byron Kenneth Armstrong, had previously attended Howard University and had come into contact with men belonging to the only national Black Greek-Letter Fraternity currently in existence.  Their experiences at Howard gave rise to the chief motivating spirits which sowed of the seed for a fraternity at Indiana University and crystallized the idea of establishing an independent Greek-letter organization.

Consequently, eight other men met with Diggs and Armstrong for the purpose of organizing such a fraternity.  The charter members were Elder Watson Diggs, Byron K. Armstrong, John M. Lee, Henry T. Asher, Marcus P. Blakemore, Guy L. Grant, Paul W. Caine, George W. Edmonds, Ezra D. Alexander and Edward G. Irvin.  The Founders sought one another’s company between classes and dropped by one another’s places of lodging to further discuss the means of formulating the fledgling fraternity in an effort to relieve the depressing isolation.  They found that through these close interactions, they had common interests and a close bond began to emerge.  The organization was given the temporary name of Alpha Omega, while they further developed the formation of the organization.  Diggs presided as president, while Irvin was assigned as temporary secretary of Alpha Omega.  Alpha and Omega, the first and the last letters of the Greek alphabet correlate to Christ and the Founder’s relationship and connection to the church.

The Founders were God-fearing, and serious-minded young men who possessed the imagination, ambition, courage and determination to defy custom in pursuit of a college education and careers.  The ideals of the church were an important foundation of the Fraternity.  One of the 5 Objectives of the Fraternity is: “To promote the spiritual, social, intellectual and moral welfare of members.”  Many aspects of the Fraternity’s rites are engrained in Christianity ideals and contain excerpts from the Bible.

It was clear at the outset that the new fraternity would not warm over principles or practices of other organizations.  Nor would the new Fraternity seek its members in the manner of other Greek organizations – from among the sons of wealthy families or families of social prestige.  These men of vision decided the Fraternity would be more than another social organization.  Reliance would be placed upon high Christian ideals and the purpose of ACHIEVEMENT.

The Fraternity would seek to raise the sights of Black youths and stimulate them to accomplishments higher than might otherwise be realized or even imagined.

On January 5, 1911, the Fraternity then became known as Kappa Alpha Nu, possibly as a tribute to the Black students of 1903 (the Alpha Kappa Nu Greek Society) who preceded them at Indiana University.  These men of vision decided Kappa Alpha Nu would be more than another social organization. It would be the only Greek-letter organization founded with the concept of achievement.  Kappa Alpha Nu began uniting college men of culture, patriotism and honor in a Bond of fraternity.  Primarily, under the efforts and leadership of the calm, methodical, and philosophical Elder W. Diggs and the critical, and scholarly Byron K. Armstrong, the Kappa Alpha Nu Fraternity was founded.  Through their combined labors, the fraternity’s ritual and ceremonial forms, constitution, hymn and motto were created, and insignia and emblems were fashioned.  Taking careful attention to detail and to ensure the fraternity was rooted in authenticity, these Founder Diggs took courses in Greek heraldry and mythology and applied their combined knowledge to the development of these articles.  The idealist, John Milton Lee also contributed significantly to the fledgling organization.  For their works to establish the fraternity, Diggs was named permanent chairman, Lee was designated as secretary and Armstrong as sergeant-at-arms.  These three Founders are credited with guiding the infant Fraternity through the most perilous years of its life.  Able assistance provided by each of the remaining Founders furnished necessary sustenance for the embryonic group.  Kappa Alpha Nu became the first incorporated Black Fraternity in the United States once granted a charter by the Indiana Secretary of State on May 15, 1911.

Born out of the vestiges of racism, Kappa Alpha Nu encountered another metamorphosis, partially related to action of bigotry.  One day as one of the Fraternity members, Frank Summers, was running the hurdles, Founder Diggs overheard a White student state, “He is a member of Kappa Alpha Nig”.  There was an additional misunderstanding being attributed to the acronym of the Fraternity’s Greek letters, KAN.  Some confused the abbreviation of the letters to refer to the state of Kansas.  The name of Fraternity and the image it portrayed was of paramount importance.  These incidents caused the Founders to change the name of the Fraternity.  The Greek Letter Ψ was chosen in place of N and the Fraternity acquired a distinctive Greek letter symbol and Kappa Alpha Psi ®thereby became an indistinguishable Greek-letter Fraternity.  The name was officially changed to Kappa Alpha Psi on a resolution adopted at the Grand Chapter Meeting in December 1914. This change became effective April 15, 1915.

Kappa Alpha Psi® was the first to Black Greek Lettered Organization to issue a monthly publication.  The inaugural edition of the Kappa Alpha Nu Journal debuted April 1914 and has printed uninterrupted since with the exception to 1918 and 1919, due to WWI.

Since the beginning, every endeavor was directed toward establishing the Fraternity upon a strong foundation before embarking on plans of expansion.  Careful consideration was given to ensure the organization established a firm foundation the first year before efforts to expand were attempted.  Five chapters were chartered from 1913-1915, centered in the Midwest; with the first chapter being established in the East in 1915.  Except for the years of World War, I and II, when some Grand Chapter Meetings were suspended, Kappa Alpha Psi ® has grown and prevailed with unabating impetus.

Kappa Alpha Psi®, now comprised of functioning Undergraduate and Alumni Chapters on major campuses and in cities throughout the country, is the crystallization of a dream. It is the beautiful realization of a vision shared commonly by the late Revered Founders that enabled them to sow the seed of a fraternal tree whose fruit is available to, and now enjoyed by college men everywhere, regardless of their color, religion or national origin.

It is a fact of which Kappa Alpha Psi® is proud that the Constitution has never contained any clause which either excluded or suggested the exclusion of a man from membership merely because of his color, creed, or national origin.

Kappa Alpha Psi® is the 2nd oldest existing collegiate historically Black Greek Letter Fraternity and the 1st intercollegiate Fraternity incorporated as a national body.  It remains the only Greek letter organization with its Alpha Chapter on Indiana University’s campus.  The Fraternity has over 125,000 members with 700 undergraduate and alumni chapters in nearly every state of the United States, and international chapters in Nigeria, South Africa, the West Indies, the United Kingdom, Germany, Korea and Japan.

Through its worldwide prominence, Kappa Alpha Psi® has had a global impact on events which affect our local communities as well as places around the globe.  Local chapters of Kappa Alpha Psi® participate in community outreach activities to feed the homeless, provide scholarships to young people matriculating to college, serve as mentors to young men, participate in blood drives and serve as hosts of seminars for public health awareness to name a few.  Nationally, Kappa Alpha Psi ® has provided summer enrichment camps and provided funds for St. Jude Medical Research Center to assist in the fight against childhood catastrophic diseases by raising more than $1 Million.  Internationally, Kappa Alpha Psi® members have answered the call to service by proudly serving our military in wars since WWI and raising funds to assist those in need following natural disasters around the world, including hurricanes, tornadoes, typhoons and earthquakes.

Kappa Alpha Psi® proudly boasts of members who epitomize the very essence of Achievement in Every Field of Human Endeavor.  Some of these members include: Ralph Abernathy, Wilt Chamberlin, Montell Jordan, Benjamin Jealous, Oscar Robertson, Cedric the Entertainer, Arthur Ashe, Mike Tomlin, Gayle Sayers, Adrian Fenty, Robert S. Abbott, Bennie Thompson, Donald Byrd, Johnnie Cochran, Ed Gardner, Smokie Norful, John Singleton, Tom Bradley, Bob Johnson, John Conyers, Alcee Hastings, Lerone Bennett, Jr., Kwame Jackson, Bill Russell, Tavis Smiley, Marvin Sapp, and Colin Kaepernick to name a few. https://kappaalphapsi1911.com/ 

Omega Psi Phi 

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. is the first international fraternal organization founded on the campus of a historically black college.

On the evening of November 17, 1911, Omega Psi Phi was founded inside the Science Building (later renamed Thirkield Hall) at Howard University located in Washington, D.C. The founders were three undergraduates — Edgar Amos LoveOscar James Cooper and Frank Coleman. Joining them was their faculty adviser, Ernest Everett Just.

From the initials of the Greek phrase meaning, “friendship is essential to the soul,” the name Omega Psi Phi was derived. That phrase was selected as the motto.

Manhood, Scholarship, Perseverance and Uplift were adopted as Cardinal Principles.

On November 23, 1911, Edgar A. Love became the first Grand Basileus (National President). Oscar J. Cooper and Frank Coleman were selected to be the Grand Keeper of the Records (National Secretary) and Grand Keeper of Seals (National Treasurer), respectively. Eleven undergraduate men were selected to become the charter members.

Alpha chapter was organized with fourteen charter members on December 15, 1911. Brothers Edgar A. Love, Oscar J. Cooper and Frank Coleman were elected the chapter’s first Basileus, Keeper of Records, and Keeper of Seals, respectively.

Brother Cooper became the fraternity’s second Grand Basileus in 1912 and authorized the investigation of establishing a second chapter on the campus of Lincoln University located in Pennsylvania.

Brother Love was elected as the third Grand Basileus in 1912 and served until 1915. In 1912, Howard University officials did not initially recognize the fraternity as a national organization and Omega Psi Phi’s leadership refused to accept limited recognition. As a result, the fraternity operated without official sanction, until the university withdrew its opposition in 1914, the same year Beta chapter was chartered at Lincoln University.

Omega Psi Phi was incorporated under the laws of the District of Columbia on October 28, 1914. Brother George E. Hall, the fourth Grand Basileus, authorized the establishment of Gamma chapter in Boston.

Brother Clarence F. Holmes served as Omega’s sixth Grand Basileus. Under his leadership, the fraternity’s first official hymn, “Omega Men Draw Nigh,” was written by Otto Bohannon.

Omega played a vital role when the United States entered World War I in 1917 by having several brothers in the first class of black soldiers graduate from Camp Fort Des Moines, a military training facility located in Iowa. Several Omegas, including Campbell C. Johnson, John Purnell and founders Frank Coleman and Edgar A. Love are among its graduates.

A year later in 1918, retired Colonel Charles Young, rode 500 miles on horseback, from Wilberforce, Ohio, to the nation’s capital, to show he was always fit for duty.

Stanley Douglas served as editor to the first Oracle which was published in the spring of 1919.

In 1919, Raymond G. Robinson, the seventh Grand Basileus, established Delta chapter on the campus of Meharry Medical School which is located in Nashville, Tennessee.

Stanley Douglas served as Editor of the Oracle which was first published in the spring of 1919. When Robinson left office in 1920 there were ten chapters in operation.

Harold H. Thomas, the eighth Grand Basileus, was elected at the Nashville Grand Conclave in 1920.

During this Conclave, Carter G. Woodson inspired the establishment of National Achievement Week to promote the study of Negro life and history. The Atlanta Grand Conclave in 1921 brought an end the fraternity’s first decade. Omega built a strong and effective force of men dedicated to its cardinal principles of manhood, scholarship, perseverance, and uplift.  https://oppf.org/ 

Phi Beta Sigma

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C., January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. The Founders, Honorable A. Langston Taylor, Honorable Leonard F. Morse, and Honorable Charles I. Brown, wanted to organize a Greek letter fraternity that would truly exemplify the ideals of brotherhood, scholarship, and service.

The Founders deeply wished to create an organization that viewed itself as “a part of” the general community rather than “apart from” the general community. They believed that each potential member should be judged by his own merits, rather than his family background or affluence…without regard to race, nationality, skin tone or texture of hair. They desired for their fraternity to exist as part of an even greater brotherhood which would be devoted to the “inclusive we” rather than the “exclusive we”.

From its inception, the Founders also conceived Phi Beta Sigma as a mechanism to deliver services to the general community. Rather than gaining skills to be utilized exclusively for themselves and their immediate families, they held a deep conviction that they should return their newly acquired skills to the communities from which they had come. This deep conviction was mirrored in the Fraternity’s motto, “Culture For Service and Service For Humanity”.

Today, Phi Beta Sigma has blossomed into an international organization of leaders. No longer a single entity, members of the Fraternity have been instrumental in the establishment of the Phi Beta Sigma National Foundation, the Phi Beta Sigma Federal Credit Union and The Sigma Beta Club Foundation. Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, founded in 1920 with the assistance of Phi Beta Sigma, is the sister organization of the Fraternity.

The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma are the Fraternity’s most valuable resource and strength. They are the primary means by which the Phi Beta Sigma objectives will be achieved. In order to accomplish the Fraternity’s objectives, it is essential that systems are instituted that effectively embody “Culture for Service and Service For Humanity” and promote brotherhood, scholarship and service.

To optimize Phi Beta Sigma’s effectiveness, the Fraternity will:

  • Strengthen and serve proactively the brotherhood, as a supportive resource that positively impacts the Fraternity’s growth and financial solvency.
  • Reaffirm and maintain a strong commitment to brotherhood, scholarship and service.
  • Ensure that the Fraternity programs are focused and committed to serving humanity.
  • Create an environment that respects the dignity and worth of each brother.
  • Exhibit integrity and ethical behavior in conducting the Fraternity’s business. serving as a model for all Greek-letter organizations.
  • Maintain and improve the Fraternity’s technological literacy, in order to better service its members and the community at large.
  • Foster and nurture our constitutional bond with
    Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.
  • Encourage a closer and mutually beneficial working relationship with fellow Greek-letter organizations, other community service organizations, businesses and government.
  • Select leaders who are committed and have demonstrated their ability to lead. https://phibetasigma1914.org/

Sororities

Alpha Kappa Alpha 

Confined to what she called “a small circumscribed life” in the segregated and male-dominated milieu that characterized the early 1900s, Howard University co-ed Ethel Hedgeman dreamed of creating a support network for women with like minds coming together for mutual uplift, and coalescing their talents and strengths for the benefit of others. In 1908, her vision crystallized as Alpha Kappa Alpha, the first Negro Greek-letter sorority. Five years later (1913), lead incorporator, Nellie Quander, ensured Alpha Kappa Alpha’s perpetuity through incorporation in the District of Columbia. Together with eight other coeds at the mecca for Negro education, Hedgeman crafted a design that not only fostered interaction, stimulation, and ethical growth among members; but also provided hope for the masses. From the core group of nine at Howard, AKA has grown into a force of more than 290,000 collegiate members and alumnae, constituting 1,007 chapters in 42 states, the District of Columbia, the US Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, Germany, Liberia, South Korea, Japan, Canada, South Africa and the Middle East.

Because they believed that Negro college women represented “the highest—more education, more enlightenment, and more of almost everything that the great mass of Negroes never had” — Hedgeman and her cohorts worked to honor what she called “an everlasting debt to raise them (Negroes) up and to make them better.” For more than a century, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sisterhood has fulfilled that obligation by becoming an indomitable force for good in their communities, state, nation, and the world. The Alpha Kappa Alpha program today still reflects the communal consciousness steeped in the AKA tradition and embodied in AKA’s credo, “To be supreme in service to all mankind.” Cultural awareness and social advocacy marked Alpha Kappa Alpha’s infancy, but within one year (1914) of acquiring corporate status, AKA had also made its mark on education, establishing a scholarship award. The programming was a prelude to the thousands of pioneering and enduring initiatives that eventually defined the Alpha Kappa Alpha brand.

Through the years, Alpha Kappa Alpha has used the Sisterhood as a grand lever to raise the status of African-Americans, particularly girls and women. AKA has enriched minds and encouraged life-long learning; provided aid for the poor, the sick, and underserved; initiated social action to advance human and civil rights; worked collaboratively with other groups to maximize outreach on progressive endeavors; and continually produced leaders to continue its credo of service. Guided by twenty-nine international presidents from Nellie M. Quander (1913-1919) to Glenda Baskin Glover (2018-2022), with reinforcement from a professional headquarters staff since 1949; AKA’s corps of volunteers has instituted groundbreaking social action initiatives and social service programs that have transformed communities for the better— continually emitting progress in cities, states, the nation, and the world.

Historical Sorority Program Initiatives

1900s—Promoted Negro culture and encouraged social action through presentation of Negro artists and social justice advocates, including elocutionist Nathaniel Guy, Hull House founder Jane Addams, and U. S. Congressman Martin Madden (1908-1915). Established the first organizational scholarship at Howard University (1914).

1920s—Worked to dispel notions that Negroes were unfit for certain professions, and guided. Negroes in avoiding career mistakes (1923); pushed anti-lynching legislation (1921).

1930s—Became first organization to take out NAACP life membership (1939); Created nation’s first Congressional lobby that impacted legislation on issues ranging from decent living conditions and jobs to lynching (1938); and established the nation’s first mobile health clinic, providing relief to 15,000 Negroes plagued by famine and disease in the Mississippi Delta (1935).

1940s—Invited other Greek-letter organizations to come together to establish the American Council on Human Rights to empower racial uplift and economic development (1948); Acquired observer status from the United Nations (1946); and challenged the absence of people of color from pictorial images used by the government to portray Americans (1944).

1950s—Promoted investing in Black businesses by depositing initial $38,000 for AKA Investment Fund with the first and only Negro firm on Wall Street (1958). Spurred Sickle Cell Disease research and education with grants to Howard Hospital and publication of The Sickle Cell Story (1958).

1960s—Sponsored inaugural Domestic Travel Tour, a one-week cultural excursion for 30 high school students (1969); launched a “Heritage Series” on African-American achievers (1965); and emerged as the first women’s group to win a grant to operate a federal job corps center (1965), preparing youth 16-21 to function in a highly competitive economy.

1970’s— Was only sorority to be named an inaugural member of Operation Big Vote (1979); completed pledge of one-half million to the United Negro College Fund (1976); and purchased Dr. Martin Luther King’s boyhood home for the MLK Center for Social Change (1972).

1980s—Adopted more than 27 African villages, earning Africare’s 1986 Distinguished Service Award; encouraged awareness of and participation in the nation’s affairs, registering more than 350, 000 new voters; and established the Alpha Kappa Alpha Educational Advancement Foundation (1981), a multi-million-dollar entity that annually awards more than $100,000 in scholarships, grants, and fellowships

1990s—Built 10 schools in South Africa (1998); added the largest number of minorities to the National Bone Marrow Registry (1996); Became first civilian organization to create memorial to World War II unsung hero Dorie Miller (1991).

2000s—Donated $1 million to Howard University to fund scholarships and preserve Black culture (2008); strengthened the reading skills of 16,000 children through a $1.5 million after school demonstration project in low-performing, economically deprived, inner city schools (2002); and improved the quality of life for people of African descent through continuation of aid to African countries.

2010s—Focused on Achievement, Self-Awareness, Communication, Engagement, Networking and Developmental Skills, the ASCEND℠ Program was designed to motivate, engage and assist high school students in reaching their maximum potential through academic enrichment and life skills training to support their journey to college or vocational employment; donated and distributed One Million Backpacks℠ filled with school supplies to students over a four-year period; launched AKA 1908 Playground Project℠ to ensure safe play areas for children through the restoration and renewal of 1,908 existing community and school playgrounds; and coordinated a national campaign, Think HBCU℠, to highlight HBCUs (2018); Launched Emerging Young Leaders, a bold move to prepare 10,000 girls in grades 6-8 to excel as young leaders equipped to respond to the challenges of the 21st century (2010).  https://aka1908.com/ 

Delta Sigma Theta 

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. was founded on January 13, 1913 by 22 collegiate women at Howard University to promote academic excellence and provide assistance to those in need

Mission

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated is an organization of college educated women committed to the constructive development of its members and to public service with a primary focus on the Black community.

Purpose

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. is a private, not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to provide assistance and support through established programs in local communities throughout the world. Since its founding more than 200,000 women have joined the organization. The organization is a sisterhood of predominantly Black, college educated women. The sorority currently has 1,000 collegiate and alumnae chapters located in the United States, Canada, Japan (Tokyo and Okinawa), Germany, the Virgin Islands, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Jamaica and the Republic of Korea.

The major programs of the sorority are based upon the organization’s Five-Point Programmatic Thrust. More than ten thousand members typically attend Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated’s biennial national conventions, and each of the seven regional conferences (held during years when there is no national convention) typically hosts thousands of members. At its recent 51st National convention held in the District of Columbia, more than 38,000 members registered and attended. https://www.deltasigmatheta.org/ 

Zeta Phi Beta 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. was founded January 16, 1920, at Howard University, Washington, D.C.  The Klan was very active during this period and the Harlem Renaissance was acknowledged as the first important movement of Black artists and writers in the U.S.  This same year the Volstead Act became effective heralding the start of Prohibition and Tennessee delivered the crucial 36th ratification for the final adoption of the 19th amendment giving women the right to vote.  The worst and longest economic recession to hit the U.S. would define the end of the decade-The Great Depression.

It was within this environment that five coeds envisioned a sorority which would directly affect positive change, chart a course of action for the 1920s and beyond, raise consciousness of their people, encourage the highest standards of scholastic achievement, and foster a greater sense of unity among its members.  These women believed that sorority elitism and socializing overshadowed the real mission for progressive organizations and failed to address fully the societal mores, ills, prejudices, and poverty affecting humanity in general and the black community in particular.

Since its inception, Zeta has continued its steady climb into the national spotlight with programs designed to demonstrate concern for the human condition both nationally and internationally.  The organization has been innovative in that it has chronicled a number of firsts.  It was the first National Pan-Hellenic Council organization to centralize its operations in a national headquarters, first to charter a chapter in Africa, first to form auxiliary groups, and first to be constitutionally bound to a fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.   The sorority takes pride in its continued participation in transforming communities through volunteer services from members and its auxiliaries.  Zeta Phi Beta has chartered hundreds of chapters worldwide and has a membership of 100,000+.

Zeta‘s national and local programs include the endowment of its National Educational Foundation community outreach services and support of multiple affiliate organizations.  Zeta chapters and auxiliaries have given untotaled hours of voluntary service to educate the public, assist youth, provide scholarships, support organized charities, and promote legislation for social and civic change.

As the sorority moves toward its centennial, it retains its original zest for excellence.  It espouses the highest academic ideals and that has resulted in its members serving in groundbreaking roles in all fields of endeavor.  Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. is poised for perpetual service to mankind into her second century and beyond. https://zphib1920.org/

Sigma Gamma Rho 

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. was organized on November 12, 1922, in Indianapolis, Indiana, by seven young educators: Mary Lou Allison Gardner Little, Dorothy Hanley Whiteside, Vivian Irene White Marbury, Nannie Mae Gahn Johnson, Hattie Mae Annette Dulin Redford, Bessie Mae Downey Rhoades Martin, and Cubena McClure. The group became an incorporated national collegiate sorority on December 30, 1929, when a charter was granted to the Alpha chapter at Butler University. Since its inception, the dynamic women of Sigma Gamma Rho have built and sustained a well-known and well-respected reputation for leading positive change to help uplift the community through sisterhood, leadership, and service.

Sigma Gamma Rho has welcomed more than 100,000 collegiate and professional women. The sorority has more than 500 chapters in the United States, Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, Germany, South Korea, U.S. Virgin Islands, and the United Arab Emirates. The organization also has active affiliate groups devoted to empowering women at different stages in life. The Rhoer Club Affiliates (teenage girls) and Philos Affiliates (friends of the sorority) also assist alumnae chapters with various service efforts and programs.

Sigma Gamma Rho’s commitment to service is expressed in its slogan, “Greater Service, Greater Progress.” The sorority has a proud history of providing positive and proactive community outreach nationally and internationally. The programs, partnerships, and sponsorships represent Sigma Gamma Rho’s commitment to promoting the greater good in education, service, and leadership development.

Mission

It is the mission of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. to enhance the quality of life for women and their families in the U.S. and globally through community service, civil, and social action. Our goal is to achieve greater progress in the areas of education, health awareness, and leadership development. Our members, affiliates, staff, and community partners work to create and support initiatives that align with our vision.

Vision

We visualize a world in which all women and their families reach their full potential in all aspects of life and are able to create unlimited opportunities for future generations. https://sgrho1922.org/